Off-Site Activity and Stats Questions answered

UPDATE: The questions posed at the and of my post titled Worrisome (or not) WordPress.com Reader Developments have been answered.

My questions were:

When readers don’t have to click into a blog to read a full post in the WordPress.COM reader, exactly which off site activity constitutes creating a page view stat?

Is a remotely clicked like considered to be a page view stat?
Is a remotely clicked share considered to be a page view stat?
How about a remotely clicked reblog? Is it considered to be a page view stat?
Is a remotely clicked follow considered to be a page view stat?
Is a remotely made comment considered to be a page view stat?

When readers read only an excerpt of a blog post in the Reader and do not click into the blog it’s published on, which off site activity (see above) that they undertake constitutes creating a page view stat?

They were answered in full by Staff here Off-site Activity and Stats.  Below are excerpts:

We define ‘pageview’ pretty strictly:
– A full post view in the Reader.
– A view of any page/post/index-page/tag-page/homepage on a blog/site.

So while all of the things you mention indicate a user’s interaction or interest in a post, they count as a pageview only if they result in a pageview as defined above.

… Counts of comments, likes, follows (regardless of whether they take place on the blog or in the Reader) are all available to the blogger, but they aren’t pageviews, so they aren’t counted as pageviews. A view of an excerpt also isn’t counted as a pageview by our strict definition, but we might count them as Reader views in the future.

 

Related posts:

Scraping Off the Blog Scrapers
Reblogging Questions Remain Unanswered

43 thoughts on “Off-Site Activity and Stats Questions answered

  1. Thanks for the info, timethief. I checked my stats today and my newest post had twice as many likes as views, and now I know why. Feedback like that is hard to interpret though. It doesn’t tell me much about the quality of the post, so much as it lets me know that there are bloggers who like pages without actually viewing them.

      1. I wish we could disable that like button on reader! I don’t care about the appearance of popularity so much as knowing if my content is appreciated.

  2. Really great info.. thanks for finding these answers. I’m always curious because my stats sometimes look funky and I have yet to look . Oh and I agree with the comment above about not liking the new reader. I’m used to it now but just now default to clicking the “view original”. It’s a bummer to not have to see the full effect of the blog design or have the page view not get counted.

    1. Hi Robin,
      I’m sorry you waited so long for me to reply.

      The truth is that I’m angry – very angry – and I choose not to publish new posts when I am angry. I’ve pretty much had it with what’s going on here and though I have never been a Blogger fan and abandoned my blog there years ago it’s looking damn good to me now.

      1. No worries, replies are great but certainly not mandatory :). I’m sorry it’s been a frustrating few weeks in WordPress-land. So many of us really appreciate all the work and information you provide and hope you stay but of course if it drives you crazy repeatedly that’s not good! I just went back and read the original post–I had missed that before. The way they have designed the reader is highly flawed, worrisome, and frustrating. But I’m glad you clarified it for us so at least we know what we are dealing with and can make the best choices for ourselves and support those other bloggers we admire by clicking into their blog. Take good care…

  3. Have staff looked at the issue with the iPad version of the reader that. I sent you the screen grabs for? It is quite absurd that i can read the comments and your replies, I can also reply from within the reader, click. like, reblog etc all within the reader and yet there is no link to click on to get to your site and the full post from within the WordPress reader itself. No ‘more’ words, no irritating message as descrbed above. nothing. I have to come out of the Reader, open a web browswer, navigate to your blog etc to see if there is more to read and to read the whole post. As I explained to you, the impression is that your posts are a mere couple of lines long. I am not going to pursue this with Staff as I assume they are aware of this and it will be fixed at some point? all best anyway, x Joanna

  4. Good thing that I have a passive aggressive streak so that I don’t mind the “Sorry this blogger cares about knowing how many people are reading their blog” being displayed when someone clicks on the reader.

    I try to click on the whole post so that I can read the post as the author intended it to be read.

    It does seem counter-intuitive to me that WordPress keeps trying to sell premium themes and customization packages only to strip all of it out in the Reader.

    Thank you for your persistence in raising these issues and answering others through the forums.

    1. From the feedback I have had I don’t know what is appearing in that @#%^! Reader and what isn’t appearing and I’ll be damned before I provide full posts on my content anywhere other than on my blog.

      Note what Joann posted above and what SPSischer and KokkieH posted below. I’m now as clear as mud when it comes to knowing what will display in that @#%^! Reader.

    1. Hi there,
      A blog friendly Reader would make me cheer. If we had optional settings for which part of our content and how much of our content was displayed in the Reader I’d be happier.

  5. timethief, this comment is off topic but I’m following your guidelines for commenting on a post on which comments are closed: http://onecoolsitebloggingtips.com/2011/06/20/why-blog-comment-moderation-is-a-good-thing/.

    Your blog has been an incredible help to me as a new blogger and I’m a proud follower. But I have been unable to find any answer about how to moderate pingbacks when my post is just included in a long list of links copied into the end of another blogger’s post. This is happening to me now that I’m participating in the weekly photo challenge. While I will go check out the blogs that link to me, I am disinclined to approve it even if their post is relevant and their blog appears 100% legitimate. I can understand (well, maybe) why bloggers with less-trafficked blogs might do this, but why would someone with a blog with tens of thousands of hits? Would you address moderation etiquette in this situation? Thanks so much, for all you do!

    1. Understand that anyone can backlink to our content and that when they do a pingback is sent to us for approval along with comments.http://en.support.wordpress.com/comments/pingbacks/

      We do not have to approve any pingback and I don’t choose to approve many of those I receive. I check out the post and site that the pingback is being sent from, and I don’t post them if I don’t wish to have my blog associated with the blog in question.

      What you describe is an opportunistic practice and I noticed that many who participate in memes such as the weekly or daily this or that memes employ. Why do they do this? Simple. If your blog has a decent pagerank and traffic flow those who backlink indiscriminately to lengthy lists of other posts in the same meme are looking for traffic. If they can get you to approve their pingback then perhaps your followers will click the link and give them the traffic they seek. Do not approve a single pingback that you do not consider to be coming from a site that has high quality related content. If the site is full of nothing but posts for awards memes and/or daily or weekly this or that type memes click the Trash link.

  6. As an aside, I do try to click through to the sites I get in my reader to make sure it is registered as a visit. I don’t know if anyone else does this, maybe we should start some sort of campaign, I don’t want a reader – I want to go straight to the blog itself. The reader is just an annoying extra level to go through.

    Jim

    1. If I could nuke this iteration of the Reader it would be gone, gone, gone – forever gone. Did I clearly convey how much I hate the design we have now? All I need is a list of permalinked post titles to posts published in the last 72 hours on the blogs I follow. As far as I’m concerned all the rest is useless tat and I cannot express how much I despise the horrid pop-up box without cursing.

      1. *dons flame-retardant suit* … Yep, clearly conveyed! :D

        … because I know how much extra time it takes me to get each post looking how I want it, like Jamie Ray, I make a point of reading the blogs I follow the way the blogger intended.

        1. Good. I would`t want to come across as wishy washy …;)

          I`m intrigued and reading Identical Episode 4 in another browser tab. Closing this one now.

  7. Thanks for this, I have wondered about the drop in pageviews. And I did think it might be because of this but didn’t know where to find the answers, so you are a marvel and top answer finder now ;-)

    Thanks though, it’s very useful to know.

    Jim

    1. Right! So if we provide the full posts in the WordPress.com Reader thereby creating duplicate content and making it easy for blog scrapers to steal our content that creates a page view stat.

      If we insert the more tag and reduce our RSS Feed display to “summary” we get the passive aggressive ” “Sorry, this blog only allows us to show the first section of a post.”

      On some devices there will be xxx more words following the excerpt. On others there won’t be so it looks like the excerpt is the full post. Note what Joanna said here. http://onecoolsitebloggingtips.com/2014/04/02/off-site-activity-and-stats-questions-answered/#comment-96117

      Note what SPFischer said http://onecoolsitebloggingtips.com/2014/04/02/off-site-activity-and-stats-questions-answered/#comment-95999 and what kokkieH said http://onecoolsitebloggingtips.com/2014/04/02/off-site-activity-and-stats-questions-answered/#comment-96035

      So who does creating duplicate content in the WordPress.com Reader serve?

      It doesn’t serve me because
      (1) I want to reduce content theft and
      (2) I want to ensure that full copies of my content appear only on the site it was originally published on.
      See: Scraping Off the Blog Scrapers

      1. Why do some summary posts in the reader show “x” more words and some show “Sorry, this blog ….”? Is this a function of the blog’s theme?

        1. The way the WordPress.com Reader is designed to operate is that when we bloggers choose not to allow our full post to display in the Reader that sentence is automatically added by the software.

          1. To clarify, if I choose full text versus summary in my Reading settings, then the “300 more words” (example) will show, whereas choosing summary will result in the “Sorry, this blog…” sentence?

          2. TimeThief, as an aside, I’ve found that if I click on the “more words” link, I am taken directly to the full blog in all instances. If I click on the picture or title in the reader, I will either see a popup with the scrollable full post OR a popup with the excerpt and the “Sorry” language. This is what has led to my confusion. I understand now the difference in the treatment on the reader, but perhaps I’m just one of the few who clicks on the “more words” link…

          3. That’s interesting. I always click the little time icon on the bottom left hand corner and it takes me immediately to the post on the blog. I’ll try clicking the more words link and see if I have the same experience.

          4. I just want to confirm what SPFischer says: Clicking on either the timestamp or the “x more words” link opens the original blog post in a new tab, while clicking on the title or image results in the pop-up.

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